Bombing at Boston Marathon Will Make More People Avoid Large Gatherings

I watched with horror at the injured victims of the Boston Marathon bombing.  Before the pictures could be cropped, a man in a wheelchair had both of his feet blown off.  All one could see were his bones protruding below his knees.  What a terrible way to end what was one of the most historic days in Boston history.  Patriot's Day (or Patriots' Day) commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord, which were fought near Boston in 1775. Patriot's Day is annually held on the third Monday of April.  It is a state holiday in Massachusetts and there are many festive events to celebrate our independence from British rule.

The Red Sox game begins at 11:00 AM.  Restaurants probably have drink and food specials.  One of the greatest draws of all is the Boston Marathon though.  The following facts explain the impact of the Marathon:

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in Greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, inspired by the success of the first modern-day marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics,[1] the Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon, and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors.
Since 1897, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has managed this event.[2] Amateur and professional runners from all over the world compete in the Boston Marathon each year, braving the hilly New England terrain and varying weather to take part in the race.
The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event.[3] Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts an average of about 20,000 registered participants each year, with 26,895 people entering in 2011.[4] The Centennial Boston Marathon in 1996 established a record as the world's largest marathon with 38,708 entrants, 36,748 starters, and 35,868 finishers.[3]

People from all over the world come to participate.  I can imagine the economic impact on the economy of Boston.  Hotels are probable booked to capacity.  The airlines are busy for weeks.  Restaurants and bars benefit immensely from the influx of crowds and families of the participants.  I remember when Hurricane Sandy struck New York that Mayor Bloomberg was still going to try to have the New York Marathon held in spite of the devastation that the storm wrought.  The economic impact is great.  The bombings threaten people's psyche on one of the most historic days in our country's history.  No group has claimed responsibility for the bombing and investigators are working around the clock to uncover suspects. 

I think that marathon runners represent the best of what humanity has to offer in terms of discipline and determination.  Anyone that has the tenacity to train relentlessly in preparation to run 26 miles is a hero in my book.  I am trying to maintain a schedule of four power walks a week.  Some of the runners have overcome adversity to be able to participate in this event.  There was a group of runners from Philadelphia that were formerly homeless and used running as a way to rebuild self-esteem.  I applaud all of their efforts to even compete in such a grueling event.  The person or group responsible for the bombing tried to squash a nerve of steel and determination in the participants.  Most people will refer to the American spirit for never giving up.  At my age, I am thinking about what other message that these perpetrators are trying to send.

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in Greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, inspired by the success of the first modern-day marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics,[1] the Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon, and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors.
Since 1897, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has managed this event.[2] Amateur and professional runners from all over the world compete in the Boston Marathon each year, braving the hilly New England terrain and varying weather to take part in the race.
The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event.[3] Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts an average of about 20,000 registered participants each year, with 26,895 people entering in 2011.[4] The Centennial Boston Marathon in 1996 established a record as the world's largest marathon with 38,708 entrants, 36,748 starters, and 35,868 finishers.[3]

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in Greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, inspired by the success of the first modern-day marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics,[1] the Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon, and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors.
Since 1897, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has managed this event.[2] Amateur and professional runners from all over the world compete in the Boston Marathon each year, braving the hilly New England terrain and varying weather to take part in the race.
The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event.[3] Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts an average of about 20,000 registered participants each year, with 26,895 people entering in 2011.[4] The Centennial Boston Marathon in 1996 established a record as the world's largest marathon with 38,708 entrants, 36,748 starters, and 35,868 finishers.[3]

I am starting to become allergic to large crowds.  I loved going to Benjamin Franklin Parkway for fireworks or Unity Day activities.  I also loved the Greek Picnic and going to Belmont Plateau on Sundays.  I love outdoor concerts at Wiggins Park and used to enjoy going to South Street on warm summer nights.  I am shying away from South Street because of the insistence of young crowds on attacking innocent people.  I also would think twice about the Welcome America event coming up that will feature Beyonce on the Parkway.  Our anti-terrorism units will be working overtime but it seems like some factions are intent on causing harm to innocent people. 


Most people would say that we cannot avoid these events that are causing loss of life and limb.  There was an explosion today in Texas at a fertilizer plant that killed and injured people.  It happened eerily close on the calendar to the Waco tragedy.  I don't think a cause was determined but I hope it wasn't another terrorist act.  I know we cannot hide when someone is intent on determining our fate for us.  But I can begin to enjoy public events from afar and not feel like I am losing out on anything.  I just wish continued safety to my fellow Americans and visitors for historic events.

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